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The Pergamon Museum

By Sunday, February 10, 2013 , , ,


Pergamon Alter, BerlinPergamon Alter, Berlin















The Pergamon Museum is named after one of its most impressive exhibits, the Pergamon Alter, built by King Eumenes II in the first half of the 2nd century BCE in the city of Pergamon in current day Turkey.

Originally wrapped around the alter, a frieze now featured on the walls of the the room shows the Gigantomachy, a battle between giants, gods and mortal heroes. 

Something that stood our to me at the Berlin Museums was that the information on each exhibit focused more on how the artifact or exhibit got to the museum, usually after being excavated by a German, than the exhibit itself. It was more common to read about the life of the archaeologist than the history of the alter/gate etc itself.


Pergamon Alter, Berlin


For example, I was surprise that something so well made and grandiose as this could have been simply forgotten, however I couldn't find much information at the museum itself. I had to read up on it on Wikipedia after I got back to my hotel room. Turns out, the alter fell into disuse after Christianity became the prevalent religion, and eventually the building materials were used to support a war.



Pergamon Alter, Berlin



Pergamon Alter, Berlin







Market Gate of Miletus also from present day Turkey. Destroyed in an Earthquake.
Market Gate of Miletus

Market Gate of Miletus

Market Gate of Miletus

Market Gate of Miletus




The Ishtar Gate, eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon, constructed around 575 BCE by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II
The Ishtar Gate, Babylon

The Ishtar Gate, Babylon

The Ishtar Gate, Babylon

The Ishtar Gate, Babylon



A dragon beastie! called mušḫuššu or sometimes sirrush .

According to the wikipedia page, "German archeologist Robert Koldewey, who discovered the Ishtar Gate in 1902, seriously considered the notion that the sirrush was a portrayal of a real animal."


Some other exhibits:

Assyrian Statues

Is it just me, or is this winged Assyrian holding a American football and wearing a wristwatch?
Assyrian Relief


I love how beautiful writing looks, especially when I don't know what it actually says!







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